What do BRCA gene test results say about breast cancer risk?

The article was consulted professionally by Dr Nong Ngoc Son – Chemotherapy and Mitigation Doctor Oncology Center – Share99 Central Park International Health Hub.

Women's risk of breast and ovarian cancer is higher if there is a change in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene, men with these gene changes are more likely to have breast cancer.

1. What is BRCA gene testing?

Breast cancer gene testing (BRCA) is a blood test to test for changes (mutations) in genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2. This test can help know the risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. A BRCA gene test is not used to diagnose cancer.

Women's risk of breast and ovarian cancer is higher if there is a change in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene. Men with these genetic changes have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. People with this mutation are also more susceptible to other cancers. BRCA gene mutations can be genetic on the part of the mother or father's family.

This test is only done for those who have a natural relative who has breast or ovarian cancer or who already has one of these cancers. If a healthy person does not have the a above-mentioned cancer, the possibility of changing the BRCA gene is rare. Only about 2 or 3 out of 1,000 adult women have BRCA gene changes. That means 997 or 998 of the 1,000 women don't have this change.

2. When is the BRCA gene test performed?

BRCA Test Price

When is the BRCA gene test performed?

The BRCA gene test is carried out to find out if changing the BRCA gene increases the risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer. Your doctor may prescribe a BRCA gene test if:

  • The patient was diagnosed with breast cancer before the age of 50.
  • The patient had cancer in both breasts.
  • Had breast cancer and ovarian cancer.
  • There are one or more male family members with breast cancer.
  • There are many cases of breast cancer in the family.
  • At least one family member has BRCA-related cancer.

3. Some notes on BRCA gene testing

There are a few important things to keep in mind when considering testing the BRCA gene.

Negative BRCA results do not guarantee that there will be no breast cancer. Changing the BRCA gene increases the risk of breast cancer. But there are other genetic changes that can also cause cancer.

If a family member has breast or ovarian cancer, think about asking the person to take a BRCA test before deciding to get tested for himself. If the family member's results are negative, additional BRCA testing is rarely required for the rest of the family.

Experts do not recommend BRCA testing for women who do not have a family risk factor that alters BRCA. Because then, the BRCA test may not provide more useful information about the risk of breast cancer. Women from at-risk families rarely test positive.

It is very important to receive genetic counseling both before and after this test. It can help to understand the benefits, risks and possible results of the test.

It may take several weeks for the test results. Therefore, it is necessary to see a doctor or genetic consultant again in order to have an appropriate monitoring or treatment plan.

4. Clinical significance of test results

BRCA Test Price

Breast Cancer Gene Testing (BRCA) is a blood test to test for changes (mutations) in genes

Breast cancer gene testing (BRCA) is a blood test to test for changes (mutations) in genes called BRCA1 and BRCA2. This test can help find estimates of the risk of breast cancer and ovarian cancer.

4.1 Normal

  • No changes are found in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
  • Normal results and general family risks must be considered together. If there is a strong family history of breast or ovarian cancer, the risk of cancer may be higher than usual even if the BRCA results are negative.
  • Only about 5% to 10% of breast cancer and ovarian cancer are associated with changes in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene.
  • There may still be other genetic changes that increase the risk of cancer.

4.2 Abnormalities

  • BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene changes are present.
  • Women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene changes have:
  • Women with the mutable BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a 40% to 85% chance of developing breast cancer in their lifetime.
  • Women with the mutate BRCA1 gene have a 25% to 65% risk of developing ovarian cancer in their lifetime.
  • Women with the mutate BRCA2 gene have a 15% to 20% risk of developing ovarian cancer in their lifetime.
  • The range of risks will depend on the type of gene and the history of individual and family cancers.
  • Men with BRCA2 mutations, and to a lesser extent brca1 mutations, also have a higher risk of developing breast cancer. Men with mutations in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene have a higher risk of developing prostate cancer.

Currently, Share99 International Health Hub implements breast cancer screening and early detection package by combining 4 technologies: gene testing, endoscopy, ultrasound and immunosmmunity testing. In particular, genetic cancer screening is considered a breakthrough of medicine.

Share99 is one of the hospitals that not only ensures professional quality with a team of leading doctors, modern technology equipment system but also stands out for comprehensive and professional medical examination, consultation and treatment services; civilized, polite, safe and sterilized medical examination and treatment space. Customers who choose to perform tests here can be assured of the accuracy of the test results.

Dr. Nong Ngoc Son has many years of experience directly treating cancer patients, especially in the field of chemotherapy, metalysed late-stage cancers, and end-of-life patients.

Customers can directly go to Share99 Health System nationwide for examination or contact the hotline here for assistance.

SEE MORE:

  • BRCA Genetic Mutations & Risk of Breast, Ovarian Cancer
  • BRCA Genetic Mutations Test – How to Reduce Cancer Risk?
  • BRCA1 and BRCA2 gene mutations – the leading risk of breast cancer

SEE MORE:

  • Common mistakes about breast cancer
  • What are the manifestations of ovarian cancer?
  • Wertheim Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer Patients

About: John Smith

b1ffdb54307529964874ff53a5c5de33?s=90&r=gI am the author of Share99.net. I had been working in Vinmec International General Hospital for over 10 years. I dedicate my passion on every post in this site.

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